This is not an abandoned mansion that you may accidentally bump into, let alone that you may consider “normal”. You have that strange feeling that you ought to ask for permission before entering, even when no one dwells here from more than 70 years. As for reaching the place itself it is extremely complex, going back and forth through roads deleted on the maps and around areas that you may ask yourself whether they are still part of the civilization or not.

The house is surrounded by soil all around, quiet residence of little animals in the countryside. In the past it was home of a well off family that left it around the 50’s for never coming back. It is believed that the family moved to England, leaving behind an ocean of memories.

Of them what’s left is images, old pictures all blurred out by the time hanging on the wall, laying on bedside tables or in the frames over the fireplace, next to the wine bottles all dried out. All the objects are yellowed by the long time passed, snap shots of a black and white era which the villa had frozen up more than 7 decades prior the shooting.

What we know about the house is that today it’s the nephews property, not at all interested in its recovery and for which they put it up for sale some years ago. The memories that the prior owners left here will never come back to theirs possessors, a melancholic picture that overloads you once you step out of the last door of the house that still belongs to the past days.

As it follows, the contribution of Andrea Bellandi, publisher of Athena Forgotten Tales, who has studied for a long time the history of the place:

The house probably built around the 18th century, was restored for the last time in 1914 as we can notice from the fireplaces in the living rooms. Its last owners were a family of landowners that would trade through the district of the nearby village; they lived here up until 1950. All the other properties laying around the villa used to belong to the labourers and other families that would work the land.

Probably, during the not so flourishing period preceding the second world war, part of the family decided to move to England and opening a café, staying in touch with the rest of the family back home by correspondence. In the postwar period the remaining members decided to rejoin the rest of the family and move themselves up North, pushed by the diminished farming work and the difficult historical period. The exchange of mails dropped in 1952 when the villa emptied out probably due to the departure of the last old relatives.

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All pictures belong to Lady Decay, author of the original article

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Rachele Goracci

DESIGNER, COSTUME MAKER AND LANGUAGE ENTHUSIAST. I HAVE ALWAYS HAD A HUGE PASSION FOR MYSTERY, ODDITIES AND PSYCHOLOGY. BY COLLABORATING WITH VANILLA MAGAZINE I HAVE THE CHANCE TO NURTURE (ALMOST) ALL THESE INTERESTS AT ONCE

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