Placed in the South- East area of the Swedish county of Skåne, the King’s Grave, in Swedish “Kungagraven” near Kivik, is what is left of an unusual burial dating back to the Bronze Age, from around 3,000 years ago. The age of the structure is remarkable. but it’s especially the dimension to impress. The diameter of the burial site is in fact 75 m wide (246 ft), which makes it the biggest tomb ever found in Sweden.

Below: the Bronze age ran from 3,500 to 1,200 BC. Picture by Sven Robson shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

The site was utilised as a stone cave until 1748, similarly to what happened in other parts of Europe, when two farmers discovered a tomb of 3.25 m length (10.6 ft), built with 10 bulky stone slabs. The farmers dug looking for a treasure, which they maybe found, and got arrested by the authorities. Despite the circumstances, they got released, for the lack of proof about the theft of precious objects. The sepulchre was containing two burial recesses, decorated with rock incisions representing people and ships, weapons and animals, symbols and other figures like a horse drawn carriage with four spoked wheels.

Below: picture by Uwe Glaubach shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

During the 1930 it was started a campaign of excavations led by Gustaf Hallstrom, who allowed the discovery of a new burial chamber called “Prinskammaren”, the Prince Chamber, with smaller dimension than the other 2 previously discovered.

Below: picture by D Bachmann shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

During the campaign, the enormous grave in stone was reconstructed an a passage was realised in order to visit the sepulchral chamber, earlier hidden. Due to the raid of the materials from the original site, the accuracy about them is not loyal, even though it is most likely very close to it.

Below: the entrance of the tomb. Picture by Fantomen shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

Below: drawings of the burial. Picture by Helen Simonsson shared via Flickr – licence Creative Commons

Below: incisions of animals. Picture by Sven Robson shared via Wikipedia -licence Creative Commons

Below: incisions where it is possible to see the coloration of the lines. Picture by Helen Simonsson shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

Below: human figures. Picture by L. Zuberbühler, A. Kölbener shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

Below: the whole sepulchre with the figures. Pictures by Cirre1 shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

Below: the sepulchre and how it appears with the visitors on the side. Picture by Uwe Glaubach shared via Wikipedia – licence Creative Commons

Below: a video of the sepulchre

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Matteo Rubboli

I am a publisher specialised in the digital distribution of culture and founder of the portal Vanilla Magazine. I don't wear a tie or branded clothes, I keep my hair short so I don't have to comb it. That's not my fault but just the way I've been drawn as...

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